Has success spoiled the Chicago Cubs?

Has success spoiled the Chicago Cubs?
Share this Story:

This post has been viewed 8021 times.

Has success spoiled the Chicago Cubs?

I am so excited the Chicago Cubs won the World Series, but what is the price for that success? Two years ago the Cubs players were more receptive to meeting and greeting young fans at their convention, giving autographs and smiles. This time, it was all smiles, little eye contact and no autographs unless you were lucky enough to be chosen for the special team autograph lines.

For the Des Plaines Valley News, the Southwest News-Herald, The Reporter Newspapers, the Regional News, Thursday Jan. 19, 2017

By Ray Hanania

I’ve loved the Chicago Cubs all my life. As they fought to win the World Series but came short, that only made that love stronger.

But now that they have won, has success changed the Chicago Cub? Many Cub insiders hate the phrase “lovable losers,” but have they become the “Complacent winners?”

I was fortunate to attend two Cubs Convention, two years ago before the World Series win and one this week after.

When they were struggling to win, the Cubs lineup was enthusiastic about their fans. My son and other kids didn’t have to work hard to get signatures. They got them not just from the “old timers,” but from the team’s biggest hitters.

Do you know how satisfying that is for a young kid?

Chicago Cubs Convention 2017, autographed baseballs. Photo courtesy Ray Hanania. Permission granted to republish with full attribution

Chicago Cubs Convention 2017, autographed baseballs. Photo courtesy Ray Hanania. Permission granted to republish with full attribution

This year, it was significantly different. The new Cubs stars were reluctant to sign autographs outside of the structured, controlled convention system. Fans could only get autographs from the biggest players like Kris Bryant, Anthony Rizzo, Kyle Swarber and all of the big-name team players if they were lucky enough to receive a special, limited “voucher.”

Let me explain how it all works. You purchase a convention pass and included is a pull tab that you open that either is a voucher or a $5 discount coupon on a $50 purchase.

The whole purpose of the convention is for players to sign autographs. There are eight autograph sections, A thru H, where you stand in line and the player gives you one autograph. Two sections, A and B, are special and featured 17 big name players. Only fans with the rare “vouchers” could enter those lines.

The voucher system is secretive and many attendees said they thought their distribution is “clouted” through friends, players, season tickets with only a small percentage allotted to regular people, the unlucky majority.

Schedule of autograph sessions at 2017 Cubs Convention. Photo courtesy Ray Hanania. Permission granted to republish with full attribution

Schedule of autograph sessions at 2017 Cubs Convention. Photo courtesy Ray Hanania. Permission granted to republish with full attribution

Sections C through H feature 54 players, mostly “legends” from the past, or new drafts. I’m not saying their autographs aren’t worth anything. I love Ryne Sandberg, Gary Matthews, Jose Rosario and Bob Howry. What I’m saying is there has been a noticeable difference at the convention from before the World Series and after.

Before the win, fans could get autographs from anyone during the session and even after. Big name team players signed as they walked around the convention. This year, though, they didn’t. Not Bryant. Not Rizzo. Not Schwarber. Not even manager Joe Madden.

Fans at the 2017 Cubs Convention had to wait in long lines that snaked back and forth to get autographs from players. But only those fans with special vouchers could get autographs from the team players. Photo courtesy Ray Hanania. Permission granted to republish with full attribution

Fans at the 2017 Cubs Convention had to wait in long lines that snaked back and forth to get autographs from players. But only those fans with special vouchers could get autographs from the team players. Photo courtesy Ray Hanania. Permission granted to republish with full attribution

It was noticeable. And many fans were disappointed. I understand the economics of it all. Rizzo’s autograph went from $35 a ball to $375 a ball. Bryant’s is up from $75 to $450.

Is it about the money? I loved getting autographs from the legends like Randy Hundley, Ryne Sandberg, Jay Johnstone, Bobby Dernier, Bill Madlock, and Fergie Jenkins as they mingled among convention attendees. They signed for fans almost anytime and anywhere.

Many Cubs celebrities signed autographs during and after the sessions, too, like the beloved Wayne Messmer, whose rendition of the Star Spangled banner moved fans to tears during the opening ceremonies.

The author Ray Hanania (left) with Wayne Messmer, the popular sports figure who sings the National Anthem (right). Photo courtesy Ray Hanania. Permission granted to republish with full attribution

The author Ray Hanania (left) with Wayne Messmer, the popular sports figure who sings the National Anthem (right). Photo courtesy Ray Hanania. Permission granted to republish with full attribution

Messmer was signing autographs almost the entire time as grateful fans thanked him and took pictures. So did WGN Sports anchor Dan Roan between interviews. The fans, especially the kids, loved it.

I listened as Schwarber told reporters over and over again that he owed his success to the fans. It sounded good as he was on TV or on stage. For thousands of post World Series fans though, his autograph was out of reach.

Some might say I’m being unfair. I get it. But in all honesty, the change was noticeable from before and after the World Series.

Fans at the 2017 Cubs Convention could pose with the World Series Trophy. Photo courtesy Ray Hanania. Permission granted to republish with full attribution

Fans at the 2017 Cubs Convention could pose with the World Series Trophy. Photo courtesy Ray Hanania. Permission granted to republish with full attribution

I know superstars like Bryant, who made $7.8 million the last two years, and Rizzo, who made $5 million last year, can’t sign every autograph.

But baseball is more than just beer and hotdog. Strikes and outs. It is about celebrity status. And it is about the kids. Autographs are the lifeblood that keeps the diehard fan spirit alive, especially for the younger kids.

Sure, walk past me. No problem. But walk away from a young kid with the “don’t make eye-contact” attitude and just pretend their not there?

I was disappointed. I expected more. The Cubs were there for the media interviews, the stage light cheering. But, were they really there for the fans?

2017 Cubs Convention at the Sheraton Chicago Hotel. Photo courtesy Ray Hanania. Permission granted to republish with full attribution

2017 Cubs Convention at the Sheraton Chicago Hotel. Photo courtesy Ray Hanania. Permission granted to republish with full attribution

(Ray Hanania is an award winning former Chicago City Hall reporter and political columnist. Email him at rghanania@gmail.com.)

Cubs Fans jam the Sheraton Ballroom to listen to the Cubs being introduced with info on the next season. Photo courtesy Ray Hanania. Permission granted to republish with full attribution

Cubs Fans jam the Sheraton Ballroom to listen to the Cubs being introduced with info on the next season. Photo courtesy Ray Hanania. Permission granted to republish with full attribution

This post has been viewed 8021 times.

rayhanania

rayhanania

Managing Writer at The Arab Daily News
RAY HANANIA — Columnist

Ray Hanania is an award winning political columnist and author. He covered Chicago Politics and Chicago City Hall from 1976 through 1992. Hanania began writing in 1975 when he published The Middle Eastern Voice newspaper in Chicago (1975-1977). He later published “The National Arab American Times” newspaper which was distributed through 12,500 Middle East food stores in 48 American States (2004-2007).

Hanania writes weekly columns on Middle East and American Arab issues for the Arab News in Saudi Arabia at www.ArabNews.com, and for TheArabDailyNews.com, and TheDailyHookah.com.

Palestinian, American Arab and Christian, Hanania’s parents originate from Jerusalem and Bethlehem.

Hanania is the recipient of four (4) Chicago Headline Club “Peter Lisagor Awards” for Column writing. In November 2006, he was named “Best Ethnic American Columnist” by the New American Media;In 2009, he received the prestigious Sigma Delta Chi Award for Writing from the Society of Professional Journalists. He is the recipient of the MT Mehdi Courage in Journalism Award. Hanania has also received two (2) Chicago Stick-o-Type awards from the Chicago Newspaper Guild, and in 1990 was nominated by the Chicago Sun-Times for a Pulitzer Prize for his four-part series on the Palestinian Intifada.

His wife and son are Jewish and he performs standup comedy lampooning Arab-Jewish relations, advocating for peace based on non-violence, mutual recognition and Two-States.

His Facebook Page is Facebook.com/rghanania

Email him at: RGHanania@gmail.com

Visit this link to read Ray's column archive at the ArabNews,com www.arabnews.com/taxonomy/term/10906
rayhanania
Share this Story: